30/30, Poems, The Comet's Tail

Poems for Snow and Spring

I can’t believe it’s already day 12 with Tupelo Press and my 30/30 project. Have you been keeping up with all 96 poems? That’s 96 poems (8 poets for March x 12 days, so far. . . ) and more to come.

Follow us into spring. Tomorrow promises more snow. Find the poems inspired by these pictures. Sponsorships and donations still welcome! While you’re feeling generous, order a copy of The Comet’s Tail: A Memoir of No Memory  Because writing matters and so does supporting those who bring it to you, get yourself a tee shirt and Stay Wild!

IMG_12922018-03-07 21.25.282018-03-03 14.36.54chinese new yearIMG_1316

 

 

Reconnaissance, Uncategorized

Proof of Existence

Distilling Sol Lewitt

Obliterate, says the line
curve the horizon, resist
tremors of an inexact hand
tap into the statuesque control
of an oblique axis, linger
in the infinite advance; find proof
of existence between the abscissa
and the ordinate, between Euclid
and Descartes, between an arrow
and its trajectory.

Sol Lewitt’s work is on permanent display at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art; poem from Reconnaissance.

 

Reconnaissance, Uncategorized

Sculpture

DSC_0480 (3)

Dodeca Hexahedron with Blood Orange, Amy Nawrocki, Origami paper and rubber cement.

The sculpture is sixteen triangular hexahedrons glued together created a twenty-four sided sculpture, inspired by the geometric insight and modularity of artists like of Sol LeWitt, Alexander Calder, and others. “Dodeca Hexahedron” is a guess. Soccerball was the alternate.

Here’s a poem from Reconnaissance (2015 Homebound Publications), inspired by LeWitt’s work.

Distilling Sol Lewitt

Obliterate, says the line,

the curve of the horizon; resist

tremors of an inexact hand;

tap into the statuesque control

of an oblique axis, lingering

in the infinite advance; find proof

of existence between the abscissa

and the ordinate, between Euclid

and Descartes, between an arrow

and its trajectory.

Four Sided Pyramid Sol Lewitt

Sol LeWitt, Four Sided Pyramid, concrete blocks and mortar, National Gallery of Art